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Category Archives: Career Management

How to actually measure career success

How to actually measure career success

How to actually measure career successWhen you measure career success in the normal sense of the word, you are always reaching up. Unfortunately, many people don’t find happiness in that upward climb.

On Sunday mornings, my friend, Joe Jacob, writes Sunday Morning Joe. His articles always inspire me but today’s post, When Butts are All You See really caught my attention. He begins:

Like it or not, corporate ladder climbing is a sport. The sport is crowded and the ladders are unstable. But it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t climb. Your ladder might be a fine piece of equipment in your field, depending upon who is on it and who holds it.

Joe shared much wisdom on his blog. I credited him in the past with my desire to blog since it was his “Gold Medal” blog years ago and wisdom he shared that motivated me to blog. In retrospect, I think take the path I am on now because of reading his early content. Joe may not know that (until now).

You’ll have to go read Joe’s post to learn more about what that post was all about but once again he inspired me today.

When you measure career success, you may be disappointed

I work with many people who come from the corporate world where the ladder climbing sport consumed their life.

Sometimes people hire me to help them figure out how to reach the next rung or to change ladders.

Others slipped off the ladder and find themselves disillusioned and frightened. They wonder if they can find a new ladder or reach success at all. How you measure career success may be ingrained in a world’s vision is pretty brutal.

This ladder climbing isn’t necessarily healthy either as my Gold Medal-winning friend, Joe, talks about in his article today. People who work with me may need redirection or motivation to find the best place for their work.

Topics I discuss with my clients is where path they want to take, what goals they have for the future, and what makes them happiest. When they don’t know the answer to the last point, I am concerned that they will struggle to find the right career fit.

Writing resumes is one part of what I do. Helping people find new ways to measure career success and look at life differently is what drives me to keep working in the career industry.

What about you? How do you measure career success?

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Land your next role! I am the pioneer of unique resume writing services and strategy. I use interactive live writing and coaching sessions to capture your value. This positions you for success in your resume, on LinkedIn, and throughout your job search. I help bring out your passion and stories to dig deep into your experiences with you. Learn more here

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How to stop others from defining your future

How to stop others from defining your future

How to stop others from defining your futureAre you defining your future? Or are you letting everyone else define your future? Often people put their future in the hands of their employer or the economy and wake up feeling resentful when it doesn’t work out.

Start defining your future by being proactive

If you assume your current job or employer holds your future, you can be sadly mistaken. When you take the helm of your career and your life, you begin defining your future.

Often people find themselves scrambling when their job ends or their company closes. Yet there were signs long before the end if the person had been paying attention.

As a proactive career professional, you want to be ready for opportunities and not let them sneak up on you.

  • What would you do if someone asked for your resume tomorrow for the perfect next step in your career?
  • Would you be ready to email it to them from your phone?
  • Or would you have to apologize and tell them you have an old one and you can send it as soon as you find it.

Is your LinkedIn profile ready?

If a hiring manager looking for a Product Manager, Project Manager, Vice President of Business Development, Director of Marketing, or Director of Operations searched for the keywords in your field, would they find you on LinkedIn?

Are you making sure you are visible and not buried? Are you actively using LinkedIn? Just having a LinkedIn profile is not enough to make sure you are found even if it is a fantastic profile.

Are you constantly learning?

When I was working with a young graduate today, her wisdom that we captured on her LinkedIn profile told me she gets it.

I truly believe in lifelong learning. Technology continually adapts and to know what the next thing is, you have to keep studying to build understanding of how emerging technologies will change the horizon.

Can you say that? Whether it is technology or some other field are you constantly learning to move forward in your field?

By making sure you are ready, you will be defining your future and not letting someone else be in charge of your destiny.

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Land your next role! I am the pioneer of unique resume writing services and strategy. I use interactive live writing and coaching sessions to capture your value. This positions you for success in your resume, on LinkedIn, and throughout your job search. I help bring out your passion and stories to dig deep into your experiences with you. Learn more here

Image courtesy of freedooom at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The strategy for when and how to change jobs

The strategy for when and how to change jobs

The strategy for when and how to change jobsWhen you change jobs, you always take a risk. Risks can be mitigated by better understanding the job market and the competition.

Timing is everything.

What is the best timing when you change jobs?

Changing jobs is always challenging. For some people, the thought of a job change is so scary that they never change jobs. For others, they change when things get tough at work.

Both of these approaches are wrong!

Why?

We don’t live in the 30 year job world anymore. Employers look at time on the job to make sure that your skills are fresh and current. It is easy to get stale when you stay in the wrong place too long. But that also doesn’t mean you should keep changing.

Job change should be done carefully

A client recently said that she heard that millennials change jobs often. She also noticed that some people she respected had frequent job changes.

I told her I wasn’t so sure about that philosophy. As I often do when I need more information, I phoned a friend and I messaged another one. Unlike typical job seeker searches, when I check with my friends, it is with experts.

Barb Poole from HireImaging:

The job-hopping millennial is a myth. The data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the typical worker aged 20 to 24 has been their job for about 16 months. For those 25 to 34, it was six years. More importantly, younger workers have always changed jobs more often than older workers.

But the numbers are misleading when you realize millennials entered the workforce during a period of prolonged economic downturn – missing out on years of potential wage gains. They are often trying to catch up to the money. In an era when a typical employer might offer a one to three percent raise, job hopping is the fastest way to make more money. Add to the money goal, the millennials’ place high value on workplace culture and work / life integration. This suggests that employers need to continue to find “stickiness” for their talent of all ages, including the millennials.

 Dawn Bugni from The Write Solution:

There is no assurance that making a move will make anything better. If you are moving only because you hate your manager or you don’t like the job, think again. Work is work, it isn’t meant to be fun.

I don’t believe you should stay with a job for two more years if it makes you miserable but before you decide to move, think of ways you can do your job better. Build a relationship with a difficult manager, you might be surprised and find that he or she becomes your best friend.

Other clients contact me when they want to change jobs quickly even if they are not millennials. I always tell them to look at the overall history of changes.

My concern is that just because a situation is bad at the moment, you shouldn’t be ready to jump ship.

The grass isn’t always greener and I find that some people end up destroying their work history when they jump at the slightest issue.

Strategic career management should be your goal

Recognize if your manager is not the best manager, your next manager could be worse. Jumping out of the current role to fix the bad manager problem is one option but it shouldn’t be the only one.

  • Analyze if you could make improvements to areas to raise your performance levels. Today there are many ways that you can improve your work.
  • Capture your success stories. If a manager isn’t seeing your contributions, making a list of your work successes can help improve the conversation about your work. If you have to move on, these success stories are also the base of your next resume.
  • Is communication from management coming only from emails? It is very easy to misinterpret emails. Open the door to actual communication with your manager in a respectful climate.
  • Do deep research on other companies before you decide to move on. The job market is volatile and upcoming merger-acquisitions should be part of your research.

When you consider job change, do it carefully and not impulsively. On the other hand, remember that you should always be ready. My most recent post was: What you need to know if your job ends tomorrow.

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Land your next role! I am the pioneer of unique resume writing services and strategy. I use interactive live writing and coaching sessions to capture your value. This positions you for success in your resume, on LinkedIn, and throughout your job search. I help bring out your passion and stories to dig deep into your experiences with you. Learn more here

Image courtesy of freedooom at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How to avoid worry when you face a merger-acquisition

How to avoid worry when you face a merger-acquisition

face a merger-acquisition A merger-acquisition is often inevitable in your career. Key to avoiding worry is how ready you are for the future.

When I work with clients, I now discuss how to research companies to determine their stability. This has to be part of the career conversation.

Not that you should steer away from joining a company with a pending merger-acquisition but you should go in with your eyes wide open.

Hints of pending mergers are often somewhere in the press or company information. Research companies before you commit.

How common is a merger-acquisition?

The difficulty in today’s world is that merger-acquisitions are more common than not. One of my clients has had a role in 17 merger-acquisitions. Others are concerned because the company they worked for is gone. How will people check on them?

Many of people I speak to wonder how to talk about companies that don’t exist any more. I tell them they are not alone.

Frequently I work with people who have 5 or 6 companies that either aren’t in business any more or are operating under new names.

There are companies whose sole purpose was to be acquired and other companies whose sole purpose is to acquire other companies.

No wonder workers often feel insecure. 

Take charge of your own career

One of the things I coach clients on is making sure that they are always ready for a potential change. You can’t assume you will have a job for life.

Track your accomplishments and prepare by keeping a current LinkedIn profile, updating your resume every few years, and networking continuously. If you do become a victim of a merger-acquisition or some other workforce reduction, you will have options.

Do you enjoy my career and job search content? Sign up to Read More Posts Like This One!
Land your next role! I am the pioneer of unique resume writing services and strategy. I use interactive live writing and coaching sessions to capture your value. This positions you for success in your resume, on LinkedIn, and throughout your job search. I help bring out your passion and stories to dig deep into your experiences with you. Learn more here

Image courtesy of Sira Abanwong at FreeDigitalPhotos.net