How do you build a network in a new location?

You’re ready to relocate. You even have a target location. How do you build a network in a new location? What strategies do you use to find connections and potential job leads so you can make that move?

How to find your network to get a new position in a new location

When I work with clients, many of them tell me they want to relocate. If they have high in-demand skills, it isn’t too hard to find a new role. But if their skills are more common, we work first to differentiate them from other applicants by writing their resume and LinkedIn profile with specific stories to demonstrate their value.

One of the differences in today’s job search and networking is that social media has changed our definition of location. Just a few years ago, many people who had not gone away to school or moved previously for work, might not know anyone in other states and certainly not in other countries. Today, we routinely talk to people globally and build virtual relationships that can be just as strong as those in our own communities.

I routinely talk to past clients and friends throughout the United States and in Europe. One young client and I taught frequently on Facebook. We share a passion for food, cooking, and I travel vicariously while she visit Spain, Portugal, Italy, and her homeland, Romania. You don’t have to disconnect and your conversations can be frequent, thanks to social media.

Advance research to build networks in new locations

  • Find out from your social media networks if you already have connections in the place you want to go.
  • Research alumni associations who may have members who are now in the state (or country) you desire.
  • Ask former bosses, clients, and partners who may have relationships with companies in your target market.
  • If you routinely travel to trade shows, check out the competition and find out about the job market. Do this discreetly if you are still working.
  • Do you do conferences or leadership events? Spend time expanding your network.
  • Join professional associations. Are you an accountant, engineer, IT project manager, safety manager, lawyer, human resource director? You have a specialty matching your career path.
  • Even better volunteer for those alumni associations or professional organizations. You will end up with more connections than the nonactive member.

Get the idea? You look to build network by using the tools you already have. These tips will also expose you to the best companies in your new location and potentially network you into the organization.

Leverage all of this and your new location will become reality!

If you need someone who can help you drive your job search, look no further. I have been guiding job seekers and writing resumes and career marketing materials for successful professionals for years. Let me help you!